IGNOU MEG 1 Free Solved Assignment 2022-23-Help first

MEG 1

BRITISH POETRY

MEG 1 ASSIGNMENT FOR JULY 2022 & JAN 2022 SESSION

MEG 1 Free Solved Assignment

Q 2. Draw a comparison between the Epithalamion and the Prothalamion as wedding songs. Answer with suitable examples.

Ans. Epithalamion and Prothalamion are both wedding songs, written by the same author, Edmund Spenser.

Both poems were written in the late 16th century, during the Elizabethan era, and both are used to celebrate the joy and happiness of a wedding.

However, despite their similarities in theme and authorship, these two poems have several key differences in terms of their style, structure, and content.

Epithalamion, written by Spenser in honor of his own wedding to Elizabeth Boyle, is a long and elaborate poem that is filled with intricate poetic devices, complex imagery, and mythological allusions.

The poem is divided into 24 stanzas, each one describing a different aspect of the wedding night and the couple’s love for each other.

The poem begins with an invocation to the Muses, asking for their help in composing the poem, and then goes on to describe the preparations for the wedding, the arrival of the bride and groom, and the various rituals and ceremonies that take place on the wedding night.MEG 1 Free Solved Assignment

One of the most striking features of Epithalamion is its use of imagery and symbolism.

Spenser uses a wide variety of natural imagery, such as flowers, birds, and the sun, to create a sense of beauty and joy.

For example, he describes the bride as a “fair and happy bride,” who is “clad in white, like a virgin queen,” and compares her to a “fair and lovely flower.

” Similarly, he describes the groom as a “young and lusty groom,” who is “clothed in green, like a brave champion,” and compares him to a “stately oak tree.”

Another striking feature of Epithalamion is its use of mythological allusions. Spenser uses figures from classical mythology to add depth and meaning to his poem. MEG 1 Free Solved Assignment

For example, he compares the bride and groom to Venus and Adonis, the goddess of love and the god of beauty, and describes the wedding night as a “heavenly feast,” where the couple will be “crowned with roses.”

He also refers to other figures such as the Muses, the Graces, and the Hours, to create a sense of reverence and grandeur.

Prothalamion, on the other hand, is a shorter and less elaborate poem that is written in a more simple and straightforward style.

The poem is divided into four stanzas, each one describing a different aspect of the approaching wedding of two unnamed women.

The poem begins with an invocation to the “heavenly powers,” asking for their blessings on the wedding, and then goes on to describe the preparations for the wedding, the arrival of the bride and groom, and the various rituals and ceremonies that will take place on the wedding day.

Unlike Epithalamion, Prothalamion does not use as much imagery and symbolism. Instead, it focuses more on the practical aspects of the wedding, such as the preparations, the guests, and the food. MEG 1 Free Solved Assignment

For example, he describes the bride as “fair and young,” and the groom as “noble and brave,” but does not use elaborate comparisons or imagery to describe them.

Similarly, he describes the wedding feast as “rich and plentiful,” but does not use mythological allusions or poetic devices to add depth or meaning to the description.

Another key difference between the two poems is the tone and style. Epithalamion is written in a highly formal and elevated style, with complex language and intricate poetic devices.

The poem is filled with grandeur and reverence, and is intended to be a celebration of the beauty and joy of love.

Prothalamion, on the other hand, is written in a more simple and straightforward style, with simpler language and fewer

MEG 1 Free Solved Assignment
MEG 1 Free Solved Assignment

Q 3. Who were the Pre- Raphaelites and what were the characteristics of the movement? Critically appreciate any one poem of this age/movement.

Ans. The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood (PRB) was a group of English painters, poets, and critics, active in the mid-19th century, who sought to reform the art and literature of the time. MEG 1 Free Solved Assignment

They believed that the art and literature of the time had become overly academic and formal, and sought to return to the simplicity and naturalism of the art of the Italian Renaissance, before the time of Raphael.

The group was active from 1848 to 1853 and included notable figures such as Dante Gabriel Rossetti, William Holman Hunt, and John Everett Millais.

The PRB’s main characteristic was their desire to return to the simplicity, naturalism, and attention to detail of the Italian Renaissance art, before Raphael.

The Pre-Raphaelite painters were known for their detailed and realistic depictions of nature, often featuring symbolic and literary elements in their paintings.

They also had a preference for medieval and historical themes, which they believed to be more pure and authentic than the contemporary art of their time.

In literature, Pre-Raphaelites sought to incorporate the same naturalism, symbolism, and attention to detail into their poetry.

The poetry of the Pre-Raphaelites was characterized by its vivid imagery, rich symbolism, and a focus on the beauty of nature.

They also often incorporated medieval and historical themes into their poetry, as well as a strong sense of emotion and feeling.

One example of a Pre-Raphaelite poem is “The Blessed Damozel” by Dante Gabriel Rossetti. The poem tells the story of a woman in heaven who looks down upon her lover on earth and longs to be reunited with him.

The poem is characterized by its vivid imagery, rich symbolism, and a focus on the beauty of nature. MEG 1 Free Solved Assignment

Rossetti describes the damozel as a “white rose of heaven,” and the lover as a “young man, who sits and gazes on the increase of his fields.”

The imagery and symbolism of the poem create a sense of longing and yearning for the reunion of the lover and damozel.

The poem also reflects the Pre-Raphaelite’s fascination with medieval and historical themes, as it is set in a medieval setting and features a damozel, a figure from medieval literature.

The poem also reflects the Pre-Raphaelite’s focus on emotion and feeling, as it is filled with longing, yearning, and a sense of longing for something that is unattainable. MEG 1 Free Solved Assignment

In conclusion, The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood was a group of English painters, poets, and critics active in the mid-19th century, who sought to reform the art and literature of their time.

They were characterized by their desire to return to the simplicity, naturalism, and attention to detail of the Italian Renaissance art, before Raphael.

They were also known for their focus on medieval and historical themes, as well as their use of vivid imagery, rich symbolism, and a focus on the beauty of nature.

“The Blessed Damozel” by Dante Gabriel Rossetti is a good example of the poetry of this movement.

It reflects the characteristics of the movement with its vivid imagery, rich symbolism, focus on the beauty of nature, medieval and historical themes and a sense of longing and yearning. MEG 1 Free Solved Assignment

Q 4. What attitude to Nature does Coleridge express in the Ode to Dejection? In what ways does this attitude differ from that of Wordsworth and from his own earlier attitude?

Ans. In the “Ode to Dejection,” Samuel Taylor Coleridge expresses a complex and nuanced attitude towards nature.

The poem is a reflection on the poet’s own feelings of dejection and despair, and it explores the relationship between the natural world and the inner world of the poet’s emotions.

One of the main attitudes that Coleridge expresses towards nature in the poem is a sense of detachment and alienation.

The poet describes himself as feeling “a grief, yet not a grief, a pang yet not a pang,” and speaks of the natural world as something that is distant and unapproachable.

He describes the sky as “a dome of many-coloured glass,” and the sea as “a desert, where no man comes.” MEG 1 Free Solved Assignment

This sense of detachment and alienation is in contrast to the more positive and engaged attitude towards nature that was expressed by Coleridge in his earlier work and by his contemporary, William Wordsworth.

Coleridge also expresses a sense of inadequacy and disappointment in his relationship with nature.

He speaks of the “faint light” of his own understanding, and the “shadows” that obscure his vision.

He also speaks of his own “fond illusions” and “idle dreams,” and how they have been dispelled by the reality of his own emotional state.

This sense of inadequacy and disappointment is in contrast to the more optimistic and idealistic attitude towards nature that was expressed by Wordsworth and by Coleridge in his earlier work.

However, Coleridge also expresses a sense of longing and desire for connection with nature. MEG 1 Free Solved Assignment

He speaks of the “soft clouds” and the “blue sky” as things that he longs to see and be a part of, and he describes the natural world as something that can bring him solace and comfort in his dejection.

He also speaks of the “voice of the spirit” that speaks to him through nature, and how it can bring him a sense of peace and understanding.

This sense of longing and desire for connection with nature is in contrast to the detachment and alienation that he expresses earlier in the poem.

In conclusion, the attitude towards nature that Coleridge expresses in the “Ode to Dejection” is a complex and nuanced one.

He expresses a sense of detachment and alienation, inadequacy and disappointment, as well as longing and desire for connection.

This attitude is different from that of Wordsworth, who has a more positive and engaged attitude towards nature, and also different from Coleridge’s own earlier attitude, where he had a more optimistic and idealistic attitude towards nature.

In the “Ode to Dejection,” Coleridge explores the relationship between the natural world and the inner world of the poet’s emotions, and how nature can bring solace and comfort in times of dejection. MEG 1 Free Solved Assignment

MEG 1 Free Solved Assignment
MEG 1 Free Solved Assignment

Q 5. What was the Reformation? What relations can you identify and trace between the Renaissance and the Reformation.

Ans The Reformation was a religious, political and cultural movement that began in the early 16th century in Europe, primarily in Germany, and eventually spread throughout Europe and beyond.

It was a reaction against the perceived corruptions and excesses of the Catholic Church and led to the formation of Protestant denominations such as Lutheranism, Calvinism and Anglicanism.

The main leaders of the Reformation were Martin Luther, John Calvin, and Henry VIII. Martin Luther, a German monk, was the first to openly challenge the Catholic Church, publishing his Ninety-Five Theses in 1517, which criticized the Church’s sale of indulgences and other practices.

John Calvin, a Frenchman, developed the doctrine of predestination, which emphasized the sovereignty of God in salvation.

Henry VIII, the King of England, broke away from the Catholic Church and formed the Church of England, primarily due to his desire to divorce his wife.

The Reformation had a profound impact on European society, leading to religious wars, political upheaval, and the formation of new countries and cultures.

It also led to the development of new forms of government, such as theocracy and democracy, as well as new forms of art and literature.

The relationship between the Renaissance and the Reformation is complex and multifaceted. MEG 1 Free Solved Assignment

On one hand, the Renaissance was a cultural movement that focused on the revival of classical learning and the arts, while the Reformation was a religious movement that focused on the reform of the Church.

However, there are also many connections and influences between the two movements.

One of the main connections between the Renaissance and the Reformation is the idea of humanism.

The Renaissance was characterized by a renewed focus on the individual and human potential, which was reflected in the art, literature, and philosophy of the time.

The Reformation also emphasized the importance of the individual, particularly in terms of salvation and the relationship between the individual and God.

Another connection between the Renaissance and the Reformation is the idea of the power of the written word. MEG 1 Free Solved Assignment

The Renaissance saw a renewed emphasis on the power of literature and the written word, as well as the invention of the printing press, which allowed for the widespread dissemination of ideas.

The Reformation also relied heavily on the power of the written word, as many of its leaders, such as Martin Luther, used the printing press to spread their ideas and critiques of the Catholic Church.

Finally, the Reformation and the Renaissance both had a profound impact on the development of art and architecture.

The Renaissance saw a renewed focus on classical forms and ideals, as well as the development of new forms of art and architecture, such as the perspective in painting.

The Reformation also had an impact on art and architecture, as it led to the development of new forms of religious art and architecture, such as the Protestant church. MEG 1 Free Solved Assignment

Q 6. Philip Larkin has been called an ‘uncommon poet of common man’. Would you agree? Explain with suitable examples

Ans. Philip Larkin has been called an “uncommon poet of the common man” due to his unique ability to capture the everyday experiences and emotions of ordinary people in his poetry.

Larkin’s poetry is characterized by its simplicity, realism, and a focus on the mundane aspects of life.

He has a particular ability to observe and describe the common experiences of people in a way that is both relatable and profound.

One example of Larkin’s ability to capture the everyday experiences of the common man is his poem “Here.”

The poem describes the poet’s observation of a suburban street and the mundane activities of the people who live there. MEG 1 Free Solved Assignment

Larkin describes the “long, unlit block” of houses, the “frowsty, bulbless” gardens, and the “cracked” pavements.

The imagery and language used in the poem create a sense of ordinariness and familiarity, which is relatable to the reader.

In the poem “Aubade,” Larkin expresses the common fear of death and the longing for the comfort of companionship.

He expresses the feeling of being alone and the fear of death that everyone experiences in one point of their life.

The poem reflects the common emotional state of the people and the feelings of despair and hopelessness that many people face in their lives.

In “MCMXIV,” Larkin reflects on the changes that have occurred in England since 1914 and how they have affected the common people.

He describes the changes in society, the loss of innocence and the disillusionment of the people. MEG 1 Free Solved Assignment

The poem reflects the common experience of people who have lived through a time of great change and uncertainty, and it captures the emotions of nostalgia and loss that many people feel in such situations.

In conclusion, Philip Larkin can be considered an “uncommon poet of the common man” as he has an ability to capture the everyday experiences and emotions of ordinary people in his poetry.

He uses simple language and imagery to describe familiar and relatable experiences, such as the ordinariness of suburban life, the fear of death and the longing for companionship, and the changes and uncertainty in society.

His work reflects the common emotional state of the people and brings attention to the mundane aspects of life, making them meaningful and profound.

MEG 03 Solved Free Assignment 2022-23

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